Ultimate Spider-Man #12

   What strikes me about this issue of Ultimate Spider-Man is how utterly stupid Kingpin is. I mean, the relative ease it takes for Spider-Man to steal the DVD’s that store the videos Kingpin made in his office makes me wonder how truly effective Wilson Fisk is. When you’ve spent the first half of your story trying to make your villain appear to be such a bad ass and it ends up that a fifteen year old with an Internet account and some web fluid is able to take him down with relative ease, you don’t have a villain that is truly dangerous. You have a villain who is a villain simply because the author says he is.   I can’t tell you how disappointed I have been with the Learning Curve story. There has been so much potential to make Kingpin such a bad ass that was wasted simply to move the story along. As a writer, it made me think about how easy it is to write yourself into a corner. I remember when I was writing my first novel (which is now available on Amazon Here) I encountered a scene where I wrote myself into a corner. I ended up writing pretty much all the active characters that I was using at the time into scenarios that they could not escape from. They had nothing really to do because I wrote them into scenarios where they had nothing to do. I sat on the story for a couple weeks before I realized what I did and ended up rewriting the scene all together.

   Here, Brian Bendis gave us the impression that Wilson Fisk was such a badass. He’s the head of all real crime in New York. He’s supposed to be Don Corleone who also has the ability to squeeze your head off like it were a grape. Yet when we have Peter discovering quite quickly that he has a video system set up in his offices that records absolutely everything that happens there as well as stealing the recordings in question and releasing them to the media within a couple days time, you have to ask how Wilson Fisk can be so dangerous for so long if a fifteen year old can bring his empire down so quickly. What does that also say about other criminals who meet up with Kingpin that they never noticed or acted upon the information that Peter discovered.

   What I would have liked to see was the issue with Kingpin be revealed over time. Peter resolved this way too quickly. Now yeah, this is a comic and Wilson Fisk will be back in order to try and get some revenge. That’s what make comics such fun. But to set up a villain who is supposed to be king bad ass in such a horrible, lazy way is disappointing. If there was time for Peter to make the discoveries he did as well as learning from his mistakes with other villains before he takes down Kingpin than you’d have no complaint from me. The fact that in five short issues Peter goes from naïve novice to making all the right moves to defeat a criminal mastermind makes you wonder if the criminal in question is really such a mastermind.

   One good thing that happens this issue is the humor. Spider-Man is known for mouthing off to the people he fights. The big showdown between Spider-Man and Kingpin was great. The fact that Peter took the time to write down insults on index cards just to read them off to Kingpin was funny and fit his character to date. It didn’t seem forced.

Bottom Line:

   There will never be an artist you encounter where you like absolutely everything they do. I love Brian Bendis’s work. As far as comic book writers go, there is second to none out there today. The fact is that with the sheer amount of work he has to produce on a monthly basis, not every story will be a winner. This issue was not a winner. It has some great moments to be sure but the execution for this whole Learning Curve story was bad. Not that it was a bad idea for a story. The seed for the story is fine. It could have been played out so much better. I think they could have stretched this out but hey, what do I know?

   I did love the art for this issue. Very reminiscent of the Silver Age work of Steve Ditko with a modern flair to it. One drawback of how comics used to be drawn was the fact that with four colors to work with, they could only do so much. (For folks that may not know, ink costs money. Comic book companies back in the day used to limit the artists to four colors to work with. They could mix them up as much as they liked to produce the color they need but they only had four to work with. With computers, that is becoming less of an issue today especially for bigger companies like DC and Marvel.)

   The love that Kingpin is drawn with should be acknowledged. With any other artist, it is possible that Wilson Fisk could be drawn as just a big fat guy. While he certainly has considerable girth in this issue, you can’t help but experience the fear that Peter must feel seeing the guy. Mark Bagly successfully conveyed the strength of Kingpin through his facial expressions and body language. Bagly to this point has been great with showing the most subtle of emotions in a realistic way.

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